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are in the majority, it's a little bit of a greater responsibility. harry reid has to make the decision whether or not to bring these bills to the floor. there are marginal members in his caucus that might not want to take these issues up. he is responsible for them in some sense. i do believe the mayor is very much involved in this issue. we've been spending a lot of time lobbying members of congress, members of the senate on both republicans and democrats. i do believe that the senate is going to take these issues up. i do believe harry reid is going to bring comprehensive gun bill to the floor. maybe in different pieces. it may be one package. that will be his decision. i do believe something is going to pass in a bipartisan way out of the senate. you saw politico reporting there was a bipartisan group, republicans and democrats from rural and urban states who are working on a comprehensive package on a background checks. i thinkure going to see something get through the senate, and then i think you will have house republicans -- not the majority of them. some number. 20, 30, 40. who will be
of trying to protect mr. menendez, a new jersey democrat, the senate majority leader harry reid needs to remove his gavel pending credible resolution by the senate ethics committee of the swirling accusations of misconduct. is senator menendez in -- in trouble or at least in danger of temporarily losing? he just became the chair of this committee? >> i had a chance to ask harry reid about this at a news conference a couple of weeks ago, and senator reid is giving no indication whatsoever that he is going to take the gavel away, and senator menendez is right about some of the allegations, some of the others that popped up in the conservative news side, the daily caller, no evidence to correspond roborate. the political -- >> almost two years late. >> and did not put them on his disclosure form is a problem for him. >> two weeks ago is one thing. now -- i mean "the new york times" calling for a democrat to remove a democrat from a committee is fairly noteworthy. >> let's say new jersey doesn't exactly have the best record when it comes to ethics in government. what "the new york times"
to harry reid. bill: that is cab fare, by the way. steve hayes, senior writer, "weekly standard." fox news contributor. good morning to you. >> good morning bill. >> president is on the road. no meetings to talk about this between senate leaders and house leaders. no meetings with the administration. friday there is no session on the schedule for congress. >> right. what's different about this one is that in the past, the fiscal cliff, these other things you at least staff to staff contact and negotiations and ongoing discussions, sort of largely out of public view. that even is not happening in this scenario. i think we're likely to see the sequester come march first and see how it plays out the next month. bill: if it comes, this deadline is little different from what we've seen in the past, steve. >> right. bill: this is gradual. make it works its way into the system a little bit at a time during the month of march. for sure during april. >> right. bill: it seems to have a different feel. there is not the urgency there. >> it does. this is where the white house is having, creating some
eternal. the president can sit down with harry reid tonight and work with senate democrats who have the majority in the senate to move a bill. it's time for them to act. i've made this clear for months now. and yet we've seen nothing. >> now, he wants them, senator, to move legislation that passed in the last congress. the last congress is irrelevant right now. you need new legislation in order to pass a bill. >> wolf, what's not irrelevant is last congress we had the tax increase. so now it's spending cut time. the president doesn't want to to the spending cut. we had the tax increase -- >> right now, to avert this fiscal crisis we have right now, these forced spending cuts, you need a new bill. you can't use a bill from the old congress. >> the president -- you know what, and i think scott walker, the wisconsin governor, said it, let the president come out and say, here's where we're going to cut $85 billion in spending. the bottom line is the president doesn't want to cut spending. it's $16 trillion in debt. he doesn't want to cut spending. >> he does want to cut spending but he
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)